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Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased a set of Pit Bull stands. Consequently, what extended/specialized tool kits do you have or recommend for basic maintenance such as wheel removal, shock adjustment, etc?
 

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sorry I've never really removed my tire, but i'm very interested in making my own stand or buying a pitbull stand. As far as price range is there a specific site that you recommend to buy one from?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
sorry I've never really removed my tire, but i'm very interested in making my own stand or buying a pitbull stand. As far as price range is there a specific site that you recommend to buy one from?
I bought my stands from my local accessories retailer which I am trying to support. I do buy stuff on-line but only when the price differential is large.
 

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I ended up getting a Woodcraft stand and spools - love them. It's solid and works like a charm, super easy and doesn't need a lot of force to get the bike up. I got them from Revzilla for $127.08 - free shipping

I wouldn't suggest taking your own wheels off - clean them (Honda Spray Cleaner and Polish) on the bike and up on the stands.

The only specialty tool I bought was to remove the stock bar ends - a 12mm hex socket, that I no longer need. Other than that, a bag of 30 microfiber rags is all I intend on buying.
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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Ducati 959 specs from the Service Manual:

Front Wheel retaining nut - M25x1.25 = 25mm
Rear Wheel fastener - M30x1.5 = 30mm
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ducati 959 specs from the Service Manual:

Front Wheel retaining nut - M25x1.25 = 25mm
Rear Wheel fastener - M30x1.5 = 30mm
I read that as well in both service manuals. The 899 service manual on page 42 (Page 59 for the 959) and they read the same thing. However, they do not state the actual socket size nor the number of points of those sockets that's required. Theoretically, it should be the same as the 899.
30mm 6-pt socket for the front
36mm 12-pt socket for the rear.

Well documented here:
Front and rear axle nuts - Ducati 899 Panigale Forum
 

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Discussion Starter #8
As an aside about the standard Ducati supplied tool kit:
Comes complete with screwdriver, allen key, micro wrench??? and a spark plug socket which, if you didn't know, cannot be reached unless you first remove the radiator. Nice of Ducati to let us know these things [sarc] Well done [sarc].
Consequently, I've taken the opportunity to upgrade the tool pouch by replacing its content with something useful such as a roadside assistance telephone number and an extra tampon for my 22 year old girlfriend to prevent a stain on the pillion seat. The extra room can now accommodate a pair of sunglasses! :cool:
 

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The front wheel uses a 30mm 6pt socket. 12 pt will work.

Rear wheel uses 36mm 12pt only.


This is definitive, I've done all my own torque checks by the 899 and 1299 workshop manuals since day 1.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
The front wheel uses a 30mm 6pt socket. 12 pt will work.

Rear wheel uses 36mm 12pt only.

This is definitive, I've done all my own torque checks by the 899 and 1299 workshop manuals since day 1.
Good stuff. Thanks for the confirmation.
 

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My local Ducati is reputably a hack so I've done everything myself. I only recently found a specialty duc shop who I'm testing out on Monday and working with their suspension tuner as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The front wheel uses a 30mm 6pt socket. 12 pt will work.

Rear wheel uses 36mm 12pt only.

This is definitive, I've done all my own torque checks by the 899 and 1299 workshop manuals since day 1.
Do you own just the single sockets or do you have a set?

Is there a particular brand or kit you prefer over others?
 

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Do you own just the single sockets or do you have a set?

Is there a particular brand or kit you prefer over others?
I have craftsman.

I have some harbor freight impact sockets. If you're not using these tools commercially, you're not going to break them buy buying cheap.

There's no need to buy top dollar snap-on tools. I'm actually using harbor freight 1/4" drive and 1/2" drive torque wrenches in my bike tool box. I was going to buy hfreight big sockets for the wheels but I looked and already had craftsmans that had never been used.

Because who the **** uses a 36mm socket at home, in America...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
@Kevin.H
I was thinking "Ducati Specific" and didn't even bother looking until now, but I have a fairly big Craftsman's socket set that's both STD and Metric. The maximum size is 32mm/12pt. My torque wrench is Craftsman as well. All I have to buy now is a 36mm/12pt single socket. :cool:
 

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i really don't think there are proprietary fasteners by Ducati.

There are ******* randoms like the tamper proof torx or misc. spanner wrench and of course a chain tool.

But nothing except the diagnostic software that's truly a Ducati only item.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ive bought spools and stand as well as the rear shock spanner wrench from my local Cycle Gear stores.
Awesome. Same here as I just bought a rear shock spanner wrench from Amazon. Should be good but I will let forum members know if it doesn't fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I wouldn't suggest taking your own wheels off
From a safety standpoint you may be right. However, I like doing a lot of my own work but only for fun, not because I have to. I will winterize them, change the oil and mod them like my SeaDoo's because I enjoy it. I intend to do the same with the bikes. I bought stands to facilitate cleaning the wheels, adjusting the chain, changing the gearing and removing the wheels for tire replacement. I make this my fun hobby. After all, Ducati has been making mechanics out of riders since 1946 and I intend to maintain the tradition.
 
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I recommend some tools to do your own tire changes such as tire levers, plastic rim protectors, wheel balance stand & kit, and an air compressor if you don't already have one.

If you ride a lot or do a lot of track days it pays for itself fast. Especially with grippy superbike tires that last around 3k miles.
 
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