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I have a little over 1k miles on my bike, Im a pretty normal rider I dont do the twisties or the canyons. My riding consists of commuting to work and little rides down pch on the weekend or around town. How long should I expect my break pads will hold up? Whats the usually time frame where you need to replace them? Thanks in advance guys
 

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I have a little over 1k miles on my bike, Im a pretty normal rider I dont do the twisties or the canyons. My riding consists of commuting to work and little rides down pch on the weekend or around town. How long should I expect my break pads will hold up? Whats the usually time frame where you need to replace them? Thanks in advance guys



Don't know about the 959 yet as I have only 1200 miles so far but; from past experience on other sportbikes, my front pads need a refresh about every 10K to 12 K miles. I seldom use the rear brake, so they seem to last for ever. Your mileage may vary.
 

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This one varies too greatly to give a useful number but is the easy to check on your own.

Turn your handlebar all the way to one side and look at the back of the caliper.
Never let the metal shims with the brake pin touch the rotors.
In the red circle, is an indent in the brake pads. Check on the wear marker.
If the pad is down to the wear marker you should replace them.



The rear brake is harder to check on because it's practically underneath the bike but the same concept applies. There is only one small rotor in the rear.

If your rear is significantly diminishing before your front, you may want to adjust your riding style so you brake less with the rear and more with the front. I save the rear for slow traffic, hill stops, and parking lots, u-turn stability : )
 
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The 959's come standard with what is considered an aggressive street pad, or "HH" composition. They are designed to give good stopping power in all conditions and do not need to be keep hot to work well like race pads. The wear rates are low compared to race pads, but like most things, a lot depends on the user and the level of riding. As pointed out above, the best way to check is by visual inspection. It's also common to see one side of the caliper wear more than the other.
 
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