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Ducati 959 Panigale Owner's manual:



"Turn the rear wheel until you find the position where chain is tightest. Set the vehicle on the side stand. With just a finger, push down the chain at the point of measurement and release. Measure the distance (A) between the centers of the chain pins and the aluminum section of the swinging arm. It must be: A= 1.6 / 1.7 in ( 41 / 43 mm)."
 

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Following the instructions in the manual, my chain is at 45 mm, so I ordered the proper 12pt 36mm socket for the axle and will tighten it up a bit.

The method for measuring chain slack is generally pressing the down and then up to get a measurement of the difference under tension.

The Panigale manual seems to suggest pressing the chain down (to remove slack I suppose) and then taking a measurement of the static chain, without additional tension placed upon it.

Simple measurement of distance of the chain to bottom of swingarm at midpoint.

Why the deviation from typical method?

Am I misunderstanding the method? Is the measurement meant to be taken with the chain pressed down under tension, as is typical?
 

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They're both basically the same method (up-down difference vs down-swingarm) when measured at the point of most travel (center of chain). The down-swingarm spec just adds a little extra for the gap from the chain to swingarm when pushed up.
 

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They're both basically the same method (up-down difference vs down-swingarm) when measured at the point of most travel (center of chain). The down-swingarm spec just adds a little extra for the gap from the chain to swingarm when pushed up.
So, is the measurement from swingarm to chain performed while the chain is being held down, or is it taken with no pressure applied to the chain?

"Turn the rear wheel until you find the position where chain is tightest. Set the vehicle on the side stand. With just a finger, push down the chain at the point of measurement and release. Measure the distance (A) between the centers of the chain pins and the aluminum section of the swinging arm. It must be: A= 1.6 / 1.7 in ( 41 / 43 mm)."

FWIW, I always use a chain alignment tool rather than relying on the swingarm markers, although they seem to be accurate on the 959.

https://www.ebay.com/p/Motion-Pro-Chain-Alignment-tool-08-0048/1711846610?iid=272940202424&chn=ps

Update:

I adjusted the chain and it absolutely is too tight if you measure 41-43mm while pushing down on the chain. You need to measure the chain after you find the tightest link, push it down and release as the manual suggests. Then measure without any pressure on the chain at the points indicated.

I did some reading of threads in the 899 forum, and they had the same confusion over there, but at least two people reported that after talks with their factory trained techs, the manual directions are correct and accurate. Do not measure chain length from the swingarm while applying tension/pressure to the chain.
 

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I wish all manufacturers would use this way of measuring the chain. Basically your simply measuring the distance from the specified spot on the chain to the bottom of the swing arm... simply put, your just measuring the amount of gap from the chain to the bottom of the swing arm. Easy-peasy!!

All the other manufacturers have you measure the amount of chain “deflection”. Basically measuring the amount of upward travel the chain has....

-John
 

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Does anyone bother to check the alignment of the front and rear wheel?

https://www.motorcyclistonline.com/how-to/how-to-check-front-and-rear-motorcycle-wheel-alignment-mc-garage-tech-tips#page-9

If the rear wheel is adjusted for proper chain alignment, what can you do if the front wheel is not aligned with the rear?

I suppose you need to loosen up the triple clamp and forks and reset the whole alignment of the front end.

More on alignment:

http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/tech/chainadjustment

https://www.cycleworld.com/motorcycle-chain-and-front-rear-sprocket-alignment-issues-ask-kevin-cameron
 

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Aside from something being bent, I don't know how a front end would be out of line. A precise way to align you rear is to use a set of calipers and measure each side at the adjusting blocks.
 

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Just brought home my 2018 from the dealer and yea mine is definitely touching the exhaust. Didn't notice until today after my first 7 mile ride. Brought it with 85 miles on it. Unfortunately the dealer is two states away so definitely cant take it back.
WOW :surprise: That is EXTREME! I would not even ride that like that. Unless you weight 300lbs and when you sit on it, the slack is taken up, that's a terrible state.
 

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Just brought home my 2018 from the dealer and yea mine is definitely touching the exhaust. Didn't notice until today after my first 7 mile ride. Brought it with 85 miles on it. Unfortunately the dealer is two states away so definitely cant take it back.
WOW /forum/images/959Panigale/smilies/tango_face_surprise.png That is EXTREME! I would not even ride that like that. Unless you weight 300lbs and when you sit on it, the slack is taken up, that's a terrible state.
Yea I paid attention today when I sat on it and the slack disappeared. Reading other post it seems it's been like that since the 899 at least and is somewhat normal. I went for a ride as well with no issue.
 

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Yea I paid attention today when I sat on it and the slack disappeared. Reading other post it seems it's been like that since the 899 at least and is somewhat normal. I went for a ride as well with no issue.
Call your dealer and send them that photo. The chain slack is measured as per the manual with the bike on the side stand, no rider/passenger, and there should be only be 41-43 mm of slack measured from the underside of the swingarm at the specified location with no tension on the chain.

Your chain is several centimeters (cm) too loose and is very possibly dangerous.

If you cannot measure and adjust yourself, anyone who has worked on bikes can do it.

Do not ride with that much out of spec slack. Watch the video link. This could happen. Watch the video portion that is in slow mo. You can see the chain depart from the sprocket. (Ride with full gear all the time, not like that guy in the video.)

https://youtu.be/xBZWjwHgveY
 

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Yea I paid attention today when I sat on it and the slack disappeared. Reading other post it seems it's been like that since the 899 at least and is somewhat normal. I went for a ride as well with no issue.
Call your dealer and send them that photo. The chain slack is measured as per the manual with the bike on the side stand, no rider/passenger, and there should be only be 41-43 mm of slack measured from the underside of the swingarm at the specified location with no tension on the chain.

Your chain is several centimeters (cm) too loose and is very possibly dangerous.

If you cannot measure and adjust yourself, anyone who has worked on bikes can do it.

Do not ride with that much out of spec slack. Watch the video link. This could happen. Watch the video portion that is in slow mo. You can see the chain depart from the sprocket. (Ride with full gear all the time, not like that guy in the video.)

https://youtu.be/xBZWjwHgveY
Unfortunately the dealer is 6hrs away. Looking at the manual I don't think I have the proper tools. What special tools if any would I need?
 

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Unfortunately the dealer is 6hrs away. Looking at the manual I don't think I have the proper tools. What special tools if any would I need?
  • Rear stand
  • A gorilla to help you crank the axle nut that godzilla tightened (or a breaker bar or a decent impact wrench)
  • 36mm 12-point socket
  • Something to wedge into the chain when you tighten the axle nut (eg. screwdriver)
Torque wrench is advisable for the 132 ft-lbs (180 N-m) of torque.
 

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Unfortunately the dealer is 6hrs away. Looking at the manual I don't think I have the proper tools. What special tools if any would I need?
  • Rear stand
  • A gorilla to help you crank the axle nut that godzilla tightened (or a breaker bar or a decent impact wrench)
  • 36mm 12-point socket
  • Something to wedge into the chain when you tighten the axle nut (eg. screwdriver)
Torque wrench is advisable for the 132 ft-lbs (180 N-m) of torque.
Thanks, I have a torque wrench and rear stand but wasn't sure bout the socket size and the bike shop didn't have it.
 
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