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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I will be the first to admit if I jumped the gun but I currently own a 959 and while I think its stunning to look at I think it might be to hard for me to handle. I have been riding bikes since I was 16 and I am 30 now. I have had 300's to a 650 to 636. Then came the 959 and I am struggling alot on it. I respect these bikes, but not for many many years have I been so unsure when I was to ride one. Currently thats where I am at with the 959, for some reason I cannot figure out how to control the twins. If there is any help or advice you guys can give that would be great. However I think a few of my issues are that I am so used to a smooth inline 4 that I cannot figure out the twins jumpyness. Sometimes on turns I get lots of jumps if I hit a bump and it throws me off and I almost go down. The other thing is I have Ferrari syndrome, basically I ride less confident because I am more afraid to damage such a beautiful machine if that makes sense. On my 636 I would drive so much more aggressive. I want to point out that I have taken classes before as well and even took the California super-bike school on my 636 so I have experience. I am thinking about going back to a inline 4. I have always wanted a Ducati I mean who doesn't they are the dream. Anyone else struggle this hard from a inline 4 or getting a ducati.
 

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The only thing I can suggest is doing a track day event on a circuit you know very well, to eliminate any second thoughts about where to brake, turn, drop, etc. That will make you one with the bike by the end of the day, and it'll allow you to focus strictly on controlling the machine, throttle response, braking pressure, etc.

These 959s are a bike that anyone can ride, literally anyone... you can adjust the electronics and suspension to fit any riding style. All you need to do it set it up for You and go beat the psss out of it!!!

You Can Do It!

EDIT:
What are your settings for:
DTC
EBC
ABS
Engine
 

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If you did not do the panigale spacer mod,you have to do this

It will smoothen the bike out completely especially during slow cornering.

Take off will be much smoother.

I too come from a 636 which was butter smooth compared to the duc, however once I did the mod it completely transformed the bike.

Yes I too was the same with the pani, pampering it like it's a new born baby.

It will scratch, you most likely will drop it.

I know did it twice.

Just do the spacer you'll be very impressed.
 

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I felt the same way until I had the suspension set up for ME. Out of the box it is BRUTAL. Secondly, due to environmental reasons, the bikes are set from the factory to run MUCH too lean. Now while the throttle spacers get rid of the play, the real solution to remap the fuel control. You can splurge for the up-map key from Ducati (includes Akra slip-ons) or look into some after market fuel control systems that are becoming available. It is like night and day - the bike runs the way it was really designed to run. Not fun after buying a pricey bike, but this is the world of regulations we live in.
 

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I concur with what the guys wrote. First and foremost: Spacers are a must.
Dial-in the suspension is mandatory. Factory was way to hard for me and I was all over the place. My Ducati tech adjusted it for me and I've been smiling ever since. Dial-in the electronics til the cows come home. Worst case: reset to default. You'll find something that works for you. Guaranteed. Go out and ride it as often as possible.

I've ridden more than two dozen bikes last year. Sometimes the demo's lasted a weekend. My dealer wouldn't stop saying "try this one, then that one. Those included many 600's and the bigger Honda Fireblade and Yamaha's R1. Yes, they were smooth and I enjoy the sound of an L4 but the bikes don't feel alive like the big twins do. I got hooked on the torque.
 

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Sometimes I ride too hard for the street (my opinion)- I know when that is - when I get back my hands and forearms are sore from holding on! I no longer need to go to the gym to work out my arms/upper body/core.
 

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To add onto what everyone has been saying, even with the throttle spacers, it really helps to have smooth throttle control. Don't be scared of your Panigale, be really smooth with your throttle and it will do whatever you want it to. You, having come from a smooth engine, have been spoiled with smooth operation. This difficult obstacle you have might be an indication of a bad habit you have in your throttle control (small throttle changes really are apparent with the L-twin's torque).

Also, if your body positioning has you relying on your arms to hold you up, there's also going to be an inherit instability when your throttle hand twitches the throttle, your Panigale starts moving your throttle hand, and the vicious cycle goes on and on...

Sometimes I ride too hard for the street (my opinion)- I know when that is - when I get back my hands and forearms are sore from holding on! I no longer need to go to the gym to work out my arms/upper body/core.
Gotta use those legs and body position to do all the work for you!
 
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Very true. I have to be cognizant in using my core with the Panigale.
 

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great post! I struggled in the exact same ways as the OP. Since though I am getting more and more comfortable with my Duc. There are things (mostly corning issues) that I am not confident on. Ive signed up for some sportbike schools and track days to really explore the bike more. I should look into spacers. I don't really notice or have an issue with the throttle but if it's that much better i should take a look.

one thing i have VERY MUCH been struggling with is with my old inline 4 bikes i could hit the breaks, come into a turn with zero (0) throttle, turn into the turn, slowly give it throttle, throttle out of the turn. With the Panigale I'm terrified of this because of its engine braking. Cornering with zero throttle feels like hitting the breaks in a turn, which in turn makes me feel like im gonna low side. And i feel like on the street its not always practical to be only either breaking/throttling. all of this culimnates to a very unsure cornering approach. with the i4s i don't really remmeber having that uncertainty. I am up for learning though! :)

This is also why i signed up for the classes/track days. hoping someone can teach me a more proper way to ride this thing in the corners. :)

lastly, i think im gonna take the bike in and get my suspension tuned for ME :)
 

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i did about 25 track days on a built 09 zx6r. Now i'm doing them on my 959 and my mods are -1+1 sprockets, rearsets and an ohlins shock. The shifting is completely different on this bike and i'm carrying turns a gear higher than my old zx6r, also tons more power and its a big change but slowly I feel like im getting there. I'm still 3-4 seconds off pace but thats due to not wanting to drop this one lol

the motor in the panigale is very inline 4 like to me, lots of power up top and the 959 has to be kept spun up
 

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@kats when you say its set up much too lean from the factory, does this include the US version as well?
Yes. Mine happens to be the US version. Now that most of these bikes are manufactured to meet Euro4, it is going to be a more commonplace problem. Funny thing for me is that I bought the throttle spacers but had the ECU flashed before installing them - never felt the need after. I probably should, but a little slop doesn't bug me. It was the slop ----> "non-gradual" power that was off putting. With the up-map, I have much more control at the lower throttle inputs.
 

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I commute on this bike daily in Chicago, the thing handles shitty traffic and me ripping in and out of it with confidence.
When cornering, you want to get your downshifts and engine breaking out of the way before you apply front braking pressure and hit your turn in point. so it doesn't matter too much. You will learn this as you do track days. For my 959, I primarily use Sport mode on the streat. the throttle is really smooth and engine braking isn't any worse than the 696 Monster and SV650 I have owned. Also, get that throttle spacer mod It is night and day how much that improves your throttle performance. But if you are going from an inline 4 to a V-twin it is going to take some getting used too. Just be patient and take that 959 to the track. It will make you smile how effortlessly that bike wants to get low into a corner.

also @Ike We should go stomping around sometime ;)
 

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When cornering, you want to get your downshifts and engine breaking out of the way before you apply front braking pressure and hit your turn in point. so it doesn't matter too much.)
If I understand you correctly, you would be very high in the RPM range before applying the front brake?
 

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I would agree with everything that has been mentioned. All excellent points. A couple of major points to be aware of with the bigger twins - engine braking and throttle inputs are more extreme vs an I4 so you have to use a softer touch / feel. I have not tried the throttle spacers, but a lot of guys on here do like them. I agree with @Dingo, these bikes are incredibly easy to ride compared to the older models. You have to work on getting your basic setup (suspension settings / rider aids) dialed in and then you'll find you'll have much more confidence. Doing a track day (as mentioned above) is also an excellent way to become familiar with your machine without having to worry about all the outside obstacles. Remember, these are "super bikes" and they are designed to work best at speed!
 
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@kats, more so on the track, but I keep the revs way up there when corner stomping on the street, I'm just not moving nearly as hard. that's where your peak power band is. If you get it right coming out of a straight you don't even need to bother rev matching, as you can pop down gears smoothly bumping up the next gear near redline and so on. I'm still working on getting that down without thinking about it. Techniques I learned from listening to Jason Pridmore. His classes are awesome if he's at a track near you.
 

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As mentioned have the suspension setup for your weight and riding style and get some more seat time on it. It's taken me about 3000 miles and lots of fiddling with the suspension, EBR, TC settings etc. to get it the way I like it. It's not an I-4 and can't be ridden the same way but over time you'll get used to it's unique qualities. The 959 is very fast and handles well, not going to be quite as plush as the typical Jap I-4 but on the other hand, the harder you ride it the better it responds.
 

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I felt the same way as you op it took me about 3000 miles to get used to/ learn this bike. I came from a gsxr600 and for me, it was all about the throttle control. I know now that I own a Ducati, the Japanese bikes throttles are very forgiving. I used to rip my throttle, which means I would twist the heck out of it and that's what i thought was normal. When I hopped on a 959 I quickly realized it's all about finesse. Good riders are so smooth and gradual with the throttle that you dont notice any movement in the throttle hand. You don't have to be dramatic to be fast. Not saying this is your problem, just putting in my two cents.
 

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Put it in wet mode and ride around for a few hundred miles...I'm new too, I'm keeping it in sport mode only until my first service but its been great so far. I get what you mean about the Ferarri syndrome too but I'm pretty sure it will go away after a while.
 
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