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Hi everyone I'm new to this so this is my first post ever as the title says I'll be getting my very own 959 panigale I've been watching countless hours of YouTube videos about the gorgeous 959 to inform myself as much as possible.

A little background about myself I'm a 24 year old guy going to be 25 in November so it's going to be a late birthday present for me I work a full time job so I'm considering getting it for work purposes and to have fun on the weekends as well, my very first motorcycle is a honda cbr 250r I've been riding that for the past two months and I feel comfortable with the motorcycle but I feel it two slow. I've started to save up for quite some time now for the 959 (white version) but I'm not sure if I should jump from the 250 to the Panigale. I know that the 959 isn't cheap it's going to be about $15k+ that's why I won't be getting it till next year and the other reason being is because where I live it gets cold since I'm from Chicago so about 5-6 months of winter which gives me plenty of time to save up for the 959.

How is the weight of the 959 compared to other motorcycles asking because I'm currently well have been going to dyalisis for the past 2 years going to be 3 this December so I have a fistula on my left arm which I've been taking care of for 2 years now going on to 3. I go 3x a week for 4 hour each of those days I won't be riding on my treatment days since I most likely feel drained and very nauseous after each treatment since it's a harsh on the body and it takes a toll and I won't be capable of driving a motorcycle wouldn't want to risk my life or crashing the 959. I will most likely be riding on the days that I don't go to treatment and on the weekends and I'll be doing short rides no far rides or cruises only locally.

I've been looking to do msf course before I get the panigale. I know insurance companies give out discounts on people that have completed it.
So I'd like to know as much information of the 959 as possible anything helps.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Do ride one before you buy. Test ride a Supersport as well.
It looks very Panigale like and given your condition and riding objectives, it may be a better choice as it offers creatures of comfort and features.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

How is the weight of the 959 compared to other motorcycles...
Relatively speaking, the Babygale going to be ~70 lbs heavier than your CBR250R, so you'll feel the weight difference. The center of gravity is balanced though and you aren't going to feel as if you're always tipping over.

Best advice is @DarR's. You're already set on a Babygale, so now all the points of validation you need you'll find sitting on the bike and test riding it around. If you can, not only try the Supersport but other bikes as well such as a Daytona 675R, Monsters, R6s, S1000RR, etc.. Not only will that give you a decent feel on other bikes in the competition, it'll give you more fuel for your choice in general.



Got any questions, fire away!
 

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....but I'm not sure if I should jump from the 250 to the Panigale.

My thoughts are that is a pretty good jump with the limited experience that you have. The 959 is not particularly difficult to ride but it is not what I would call a beginners bike.


I think it can be ridden safely by an inexperienced rider but it probably is not going to allow the normal progression in riding skill you would get by riding a less intimidating machine. I had the same issue when I first started riding sportbikes and bought a ZX-14 out of the chute, not the best choice for a newb to sportbike riding. While I was able to ride it in relative safety, I never got really comfortable ringing it out until I went back and bought a 600cc Supersport and then progressed to a literbike to hone my cornering skills on. Now the 14 feels like a pussycat but it was definitely not that way in the beginning. At the end of the day, it's your choice, choose wisely.
 

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Just a thought, I have a couple buddies that are expert level roadracers and have Yamaha R3 (299cc) trackbikes that they use to keep their cornering speed at a high level. When you have only 30 HP to play with, maintaining momentum in the corners is paramount and the skill transfers up to the bigger bikes. Definitely no shame in riding a smaller machine and learning how to wring out every bit of performance before stepping up. I have seen way to many beginners jump on a BMW S1000RR because it wins all the magazine shootouts and can't ride it anywhere except in a straight line. They would have been served better with a less intimidating 600cc supersport or a sport twin like the Suzuki SV-650. Just my .02.
 
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Go take one out for an extended test ride. Check when your local dealership is doing demo ride days, and you usually can test ride that plus others bikes for extended periods.

Things I have learned from putting 5k miles on mine:

- The bike runs really hot. Stop and go traffic in Chicago can put this bike's coolant temperature above 240 degrees F, and you will feel it.
- The exhaust and rear cylinder are right under your balls. This bike loves to heat up your crotch to uncomfortable levels.
- This bike has a much more aggressive seating position than a 250, puts a lot more weight on your arms if you are being lazy. You constantly need to use your core and thighs to keep weight off your hands and the bars. I have gotten lazy and gave my self tendinitis twice now from extensive riding.
- This bike runs lean and has weird gearing for low speeds. It sucks at farting around town and is only happy when you are hamming on the throttle. This can get you in trouble.
- The battery is a huge pain in the *** to get too, replace the stock one with a smaller lithium one and you will be able to access it without removing the side fairing, in the event you get stranded and need a jump.
- Service costs are ridiculously high. Learn to fix this bike on your own and you will save a ton of money.

That being said, I love the 959 and wouldn't replace it with any other.
 

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I would go along with @Kruz. There's definitely a plus in transitioning up to the bigger bikes. (although, the 959 is really considered Ducati's small superbike) I rode the smaller bikes (748, 749, 848) up until I purchased the 1199 back in 2013. Even with all that experience on the smaller machines it took me two full seasons of track riding to be able to improve my times on the 1199.
 

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Jyno, agree with most of what you said, especially this part:


This bike runs lean and has weird gearing for low speeds. It sucks at farting around town and is only happy when you are hamming (sic) on the throttle.

Mine surges when hot..... but like the seat rotisserie and useless mirrors, I consider it just part of the Ducati ownership experience.
 

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@ kruz amen on the useless mirrors.

I just got an arctic white 959 last month, upgrading massively from a Buell M2 Cyclone. I am absolutely in love with it. But, it is A LOT of bike for being relatively inexperienced on sport bikes. It is faster than you would ever need. You WILL go into some corners hotter than you meant because the speed comes so easy, but thankfully it handles like an absolute dream and loves to lean.

Long story short I've been riding bikes since I was 18 (now 31) and I have learned more about motorcycle riding in the past month of ownership than in the years before combined. Super fun, but for the uses you are describing I would definitely consider a supersport S. Still looks super cool, sounds good, is infinitely more comfortable (@jyno is spot on with his description), and may just fit your needs better.

Thant being said, the giant grin every mile on the 959 isnt something you are going to regret (insert devil smile emoji)
 

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Hmmm, 23 rear wheel HP for the CBR250R and 133 rear wheel HP for the 959. Almost 600% increase in HP and top speed goes from 87 mph to about 167 mph. Somebody please tell this guy that this is a very bad idea, just sayin.
 

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I'd suggest he keep the bike he has now and learn to ride the wheels off that thing!
 
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@Kruz makes a good point too! I just put a buddy of mine on a ninja 300 for his first bike, and that bike gives me a big stupid grin every time I ride it.

Slow Bike Fast > Fast Bike Slow.

I have been putting down much better laptimes on my SV than I have with the Panigale. The main reason is that I don't care too much about crashing the SV, I care a lot about crashing the 959 lol.
 

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I've been looking to do msf course before I get the panigale.
I'm just going to echo all the great comments you have solicited from some of our experienced members.
IMHO, you should have already taken the MSF course. I suggest you do that now regardless. A good second step, because of your lack of road time is to take your CBR250R to a track day and have fun accelerating your riding (especially your cornering) skills off-the-road in a safe environment. Then start looking for a bigger, more powerful bike.
 
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I'm just going to echo all the great comments you have solicited from some of our experienced members.
IMHO, you should have already taken the MSF course. I suggest you do that now regardless. A good second step, because of your lack of road time is to take your CBR250R to a track day and have fun accelerating your riding (especially your cornering) skills off-the-road in a safe environment. Then start looking for a bigger, more powerful bike.

Good points, I've actually been thinking about picking up a KTM 390 or the new CBR 300R for a back road thrasher, these bikes are so light weight they can be a real weapon on a twisty back road when well ridden and can definitely add to your repertoire of skills. Another plus is fuel and tires are a non-issue. The only thing stopping me is I'm 6'3" and 220 lbs, so not a lightweight by any stretch.
 

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Sharp looking bike, especially for the $$$. I question the suspender quality though at the low price point, some bucks would have to be spent on upgrades there.
 

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I actually own one: a 2015 CBR300R but never thought about riding it as it's my wife's.
However, she's really not into riding at all and I was questioning what to do with it.
Great idea @Kruz, I should start riding it since nobody else does for now. Maybe upgrade the suspension like you said and track it too.
 

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I actually own one: a 2015 CBR300R but never thought about riding it as it's my wife's.
However, she's really not into riding at all and I was questioning what to do with it.
Great idea @Kruz, I should start riding it since nobody else does for now. Maybe upgrade the suspension like you said and track it too.

I haven't ridden one but I can tell you I have the most fun on my ZX-6R, the small bikes are an absolute hoot to ride fast!
 

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@Kruz , I have only ridden it to the dealer and back a few times. As it stands, I can't ride it seriously as-is as I spent north of $1200 to lower it by 2~3 inches. That includes HyperPro progressive fork springs, rear linkage, side stand, lower seat and labor. The lowering has reduced cornering clearance quite a bit where I would have to raise it back to stock in order to have fun. I also changed the gearing by going +1F which spaced-out the shifting and it's much better on the highway. All and all, I just might do that if the wife hangs-up her helmet for good. It's a great engine with lots of torque for its size and this thing at 357lb full-wet is unbelievably light.
 

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@DarR - that thing looks brand new! At least the tires do anyway. This market segment is booming right now I think. I'm seeing more and more of these bikes at the track and on the road. Ridden by mostly novice riders at the track, but there are a few advanced guys that are getting them for a second (fun) bike. Those small bikes make you learn how to be smooth, and keep your momentum / flow going, which is a great skill to have moving into the bigger bikes. A lot of liter bikes riders have the "point & shoot" style of riding. My personal best lap time at one track is still the time I set back in 2006 on my 749. Only been there once since with the 1199. Came super close, but was still a little over a sec off. I'll get it eventually, but it does make a valid point. (didn't mean to highjack the thread)
 
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