Ducati 959 Panigale Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! I've seen quite a few people comment on the Ohlins steering damper, and I'm wondering how much of a difference it makes, what it does better, improves etc? TIA
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
The main improvement over stock (959) with any aftermarket damper is adjustability. Stock dampers are non-adjustable so they're very limited in how they perform. For track use the stock units are kinda worthless. Steering damper settings are really a personal preference, but the more aggressively you ride the bike the more you will appreciate the adjustability. Some of the bigger players in this market are, Ohlins, Scott, GPX.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LA_Stu

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
The main improvement over stock (959) with any aftermarket damper is adjustability. Stock dampers are non-adjustable so they're very limited in how they perform. For track use the stock units are kinda worthless. Steering damper settings are really a personal preference, but the more aggressively you ride the bike the more you will appreciate the adjustability. Some of the bigger players in this market are, Ohlins, Scott, GPX.
I have the same question as the thread starter.

Recognizing the lack of adjustability, what makes the stock damper useless on the track? What does it fail to do?

Why is unlike any other inexpensive suspension component lacking adjustability, it works but it can not be adjusted?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
The OEM non-adjustable dampers are designed to help stabilize the steering at higher speeds while allowing relatively free movement at slower speeds. So basically you have one preset level of damping trying to cover all the bases. Adjustable dampers will allow for much greater damping power. So much so you can make it impossible to turn the bike at slow speeds. The greater level of damping is a powerful tool under the more extreme conditions of a track environment. The adjustability, like anything else, gives the rider the ability to fine-tune the bikes feel.

It's one of those things that once you try one you won't want to go without it. I have them on all my bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
The OEM non-adjustable dampers are designed to help stabilize the steering at higher speeds while allowing relatively free movement at slower speeds. So basically you have one preset level of damping trying to cover all the bases. Adjustable dampers will allow for much greater damping power. So much so you can make it impossible to turn the bike at slow speeds. The greater level of damping is a powerful tool under the more extreme conditions of a track environment. The adjustability, like anything else, gives the rider the ability to fine-tune the bikes feel.

It's one of those things that once you try one you won't want to go without it. I have them on all my bikes.
Interesting and makes sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,607 Posts
About chinese parts

Caveat Emptor.
I've had nothing but bad experience from Chinese motorcycle parts or apparel.
Bought axle sliders that didn't fit right and Taichi gloves that were counterfeit.
I would not trust any parts from there that's strategic on a motorcycle especially steering or brakes.
m2c.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 959Pant!dropper

·
Registered
Joined
·
892 Posts
If you have the capacity to do so, you should do a comparison between the Ohlins and china one.

I'm sure there's going to be stark differences, but is it worth the 10x cost?





Also, anyone service their steering damper yet? Either OEM or Ohlins? Just curious to see if replacing the damper fluid with heavier weight is viable.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DarR

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
If you have the capacity to do so, you should do a comparison between the Ohlins and china one.

I'm sure there's going to be stark differences, but is it worth the 10x cost?





Also, anyone service their steering damper yet? Either OEM or Ohlins? Just curious to see if replacing the damper fluid with heavier weight is viable.
That would indeed be a cool comparison.


What settings are you using on your Ohlins damper for aggressive street riding?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
892 Posts
I'm just running OEM Sachs, never had a reason to upgrade (based on the 500 or so track miles I've done on the Panigale).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
If you have the capacity to do so, you should do a comparison between the Ohlins and china one.

I'm sure there's going to be stark differences, but is it worth the 10x cost?





Also, anyone service their steering damper yet? Either OEM or Ohlins? Just curious to see if replacing the damper fluid with heavier weight is viable.
I have a Scotts steering dampner on my R6. It has worked flowlessly for me for the last 15 years. I have had it serviced only once so far. I suppose any suspension specialist will be able to do the tune up service. I had mine done by Jett Tuning in Camarillo, CA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Caveat Emptor.
I've had nothing but bad experience from Chinese motorcycle parts or apparel.
Bought axle sliders that didn't fit right and Taichi gloves that were counterfeit.
I would not trust any parts from there that's strategic on a motorcycle especially steering or brakes.
m2c.
I was going to save a bunch of money one year replacing some parts on my motocross bike while in college, first race in Southwick I cracked a brake rotor went over a huge burm and fell into a fence bending my triple.
Lesson learned, China = Poop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
The main improvement over stock (959) with any aftermarket damper is adjustability. Stock dampers are non-adjustable so they're very limited in how they perform. For track use the stock units are kinda worthless. Steering damper settings are really a personal preference, but the more aggressively you ride the bike the more you will appreciate the adjustability. Some of the bigger players in this market are, Ohlins, Scott, GPX.
Today was my first ride with the adjustable ohlins damper.

The ohlins recommended general setting is at 10 clicks from full tension. This is about the same as the stock tension when you have the damper off the bike and move it through the range by hand. It requires a surprisingly high degree of force to move against the resistance of the damper.

Ohlins also recommends 5 clicks from full open, least resistance, for general street riding.

That settings has very minimal resistance and what an extraordinary difference that makes for street riding! I had no clue how much resistance to the bars turning I was experiencing from the stock damper.

FWIW even at the the low setting of 5 clicks from full open (about 15 from full closed and tight) the bars are solid from the slowest to the fastest speeds on my typical ride through the twistys.

Loving being able to maneuver at low speed without the damper fighting me.

Thanks for helping me see the light on this upgrade, I too would consider it a great value upgrade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Running the Ohlins steering damper at 7 clicks from full closed is too little damping during this video. I liked the loose feeling at lesser damping settings but do not like the head shake it allows. I will increase by a few clicks to tame that steering wobble.

10 clicks out of 20 feels like the stock damper on the street.

Watch the video for a head shake when accelerating out of the turn. This is what too little damping looks like.

https://youtu.be/VBiOnT2vMyY
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
You almost have to find the right amount of damping mixed with how much you naturally pull on the bars. Personally, this is something I have to be constantly aware of.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Pard
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top