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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Harmful survival reactions need to be trained out.

Look where you want to go, not where you want to avoid going.

Control your radius of turn with brake and lean angle.

Hit the apex and look for the exit.

Shame he got hurt. Most of us have had close calls due to a failure to follow one or all of the above rules.

https://www.revzilla.com/common-tre...3/31/2018_CT&utm_term=Common Tread | Combined

"Kim was no noob. I say that based on videos he’s uploaded to YouTube. I imagine he selects laps that make him look good, but still, I saw one in which he lapped Laguna Seca, hitting most of his marks, in about 1:44. That’s easily fast enough to be in a Keigwin’s “A” group. (To put it in perspective, when the MotoAmerica Superstock 600 class qualified at Laguna in 2015, months after Kim's crash, a time just ten seconds faster — 1:34 — would put a rider about the middle of that professional racing grid.)

Maybe Kim was tired, or distracted, or just inconsistent on that fateful day, but in the actual crash video he’s on the wrong line and misses the apex. He’s not carrying much lean angle; his knee’s inches above the deck. In spite of the fact the rider in front of him leaves a very wide outside passing lane, Kim inexplicably stands up his bike and rides off the track at a place, and on a trajectory, that’s atypical. No expert I’ve spoken to about the video sees anything but an easily avoidable unforced error.
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I wouldn't say that was target fixation, but more a lapse of attention due to something that caused him to spook and become tight on the bars. He chose to stand it up and run off, which is perfectly fine, but those sand bags ultimately caused a crash which shouldn't have occurred.


I remember seeing this video and the controversy that rose from it. Not sure what came from it, but there were some discussions about the safety of those sand bags which look like they are used to control water drainage. I wonder if the Laguna Seca owners did anything about that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Yes, only the rider really knows why he aborted the turn and stood the bike up, but it does look like panic of some type since he could have either increased lean angle, applied a touch of brake, or both to avoid the departure.

Yet, when he picks up the bike his head is pointed to the outside of the track area instead of to the inside of the track where it should have been.

The sandbags are a monumental hazzard, and there should be a better way than sandbags to control erosion that does not make the track runoff area a hazzard.

I have run off the racetrack during my early attempts due to poorly executed turns and am sure glad the dirt/grass was hazzard free. I know that the risk is there to repeat same mistakes if I do not maintain proficiency, skills and focus.

Running off on the street rarely ends well either.
 

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Look... you know this going in (if you have half a brain) and you're on the racetrack - There's Sometimes NO Room For Error! Whether it's your own fault or not - Ride At Your Own Risk of bodily harm or possibly death. Nothing new here...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
"Aim small, miss small."

This crash above demonstrates what can happen if you lose concentration, or get too liberal with your line choice, on the track or on the street.

If you enter every corner with a plan for a line, and initiate correction the instant deviation occurs, you have a fighting chance. In the crash above, the rider seems to have failed to take corrective action despite a midcorner drift off line. The track is wide, but your line choice and personal demands for staying precisely on that line must be very narrow.

When you become a passenger, and cease to demand very small margins of error from the machine and the plan, you can break things or die.

Then again, if he was purposely going wide to make a pass on the outside upon exit, the rider may have had a plan for a precise line on the very outside of the track, which left very little margin for error.

Sandbags on the dirt would likely have taken out these riders as well:


 
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