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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I couldn’t get off work in time to get my bike up to the shop to get my chain tightened so I’m gonna give it a try. Was just wondering if anyone had any quick tips or useful advice for an old dumb *** such as myself lol
 

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First things first, why are you tightening/adjusting your chain?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes sir. Sorry I had a drink...and 3 hours later... lol. But yea chain has to much slack. Comin in around +50mm mark. Whilst looking at the task at hand and drinkthinkin on it I see you prolly have to break the axel nut loose to free up the assembly and loosen the set bolts then just move the tire backwards ever so gently and when in mm range tighten the nuts?
 

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Yes sir. Sorry I had a drink...and 3 hours later... lol. But yea chain has to much slack. Comin in around +50mm mark. Whilst looking at the task at hand and drinkthinkin on it I see you prolly have to break the axel nut loose to free up the assembly and loosen the set bolts then just move the tire backwards ever so gently and when in mm range tighten the nuts?
Yep pretty much. Assuming there's no issues and the rear wheel is aligned left-to-right, you'll just want to add maybe a quarter turn to both sides. After adjustment, when you tighten the axle nut, you'll want to add extra tension to the chain, like putting a screwdriver between the chain and sprocket, to get it to seat against the set bolts firmly.

I've measured the chain on the side stand or on a rear stand, both came out to be identical, so working on the rear stand all the time is going to be more convenient in the end.
 

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Sounds like this will be a new experience for you. You may want to watch a few basic tutorials, etc first. My only advice, make sure the rear wheel stays alined, and do NOT over-tighten the chain. The chain needs to move freely with the rear suspension so if you get it too tight it may bind as the suspension compresses. Not good!!
 

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Sounds like this will be a new experience for you. You may want to watch a few basic tutorials, etc first. My only advice, make sure the rear wheel stays alined, and do NOT over-tighten the chain. The chain needs to move freely with the rear suspension so if you get it too tight it may bind as the suspension compresses. Not good!!

+1, better to err slightly on the loose side than on the tight side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@telperion - how many miles on the bike?
13502m

Ended up looking at the chain a little closer and inspecting the sprockets for wear to see if it might be wise to order new chain/sprockets while cleaning it up in preparation to adjust tension.

Found that the “rollers” of several links had been damaged or were missing altogether so I parked the bike and am looking at replacements currently

Sorry for taking so long to reply. Have had trouble logging in on my phone and my computer crashed last week.
 

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Wow! The factories never use the best quality chains, but that's a bit crazy. Make sure that your chain isn't too tight.

I always upgrade my chains straight away. I recommend the DID-ERV3.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow! The factories never use the best quality chains, but that's a bit crazy. Make sure that your chain isn't too tight.

I always upgrade my chains straight away. I recommend the DID-ERV3.

I agree. Preciate it, I’ll follow that advice from now on
 

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I have 16,000 kms on the OEM and it's still ok. Notwithstanding, I may be looking at changing it and the rear sprocket this winter.
At such time, I'll return to the 15t OEM front (which is still relatively new having replaced it with a 14t after season 1) and go with a 46t (+3R) rear.

BTW, the 520 DID-ERV3 is rated at 750cc max. Compound that with the torque of the V-twin. Perhaps it's a non-issue but that disturbs me.
The 520 DID-ZVM-X is rated at 1200cc with higher tensile strength and wear resistance but only weighs 130 grams more.

http://www.didchain.com/PDF/DID_2014usa_final.pdf
 
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