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So I was planning on filling and "stabil"ing my gas tank this winter, like I hear everyone say to do, when i got thrown a curveball on the subject. I wanted to ask people here's opionion.

A guy at a dealership that I stopped in said that he recommends putting stabil in whatever gas you have left then running the bike down till the tank is epmty. (let's say like 30 miles past when the low fuel warning light comes on)

Then he said to store the bike like that with an empty tank. The idea being that the stabil runs through and into the bike but you dont have a tank full of shitty gas the next spring. Then come spring you go grab some fresh new gas and put some in and you're good to go. He said that the tanks are all lined very well and it should be totally fine.

What are you opinions. It makes sense but I figured I would see what others opinions are on the subject. The bike will be stored covered and off the ground in an unheated garage.

Does anyone else here empty their tank for winter storage? Thoughts?
 

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I think both scenarios are ok. I personally always run the bikes low on fuel before I park them on a regular basis. I put in fresh gas at the beginning of a ride or track day. That said, the gas sits in an underground tank at the station so how "fresh" is it really?

For winter storage I usually just put Sta-Bil (storage) in the remaing gas that's in the tank, which as stated above is low. Probably less than a gallon. I think the climate in which the bike is stored has a bearing on what you do as well. My bikes are in a heated garage so I don't have any issues with bad fuel come spring. Some guys that don't have a heated storage will remove their tanks and store them indoors. I'm not sure I think running the bike out of fuel is necessary with fuel injection systems, but I sure it wouldn't hurt.
 

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I've always FILLED the tank, put in Sta-bil, and parked whatever vehicle, be it my bikes or cars. I've always been told to leave the tank full to avoid condensation and fumes circulating in the tank, as well as keeping seals saturated etc. The Sta-bil keeps the fuel from, "going stale", so no need to worry there. We also do this with our boat, never heard of leaving them empty and you certainly don't wanna run the tank dry. That would leave a lot of exposed surfaces that would oxidize very quickly.

"Top Off the Tank
This is another long-term vehicle storage tip. Fill the tank with gas if you expect the vehicle to be in storage for more than 30 days. This will prevent moisture from accumulating inside the fuel tank and keep the seals from drying out. You should also purchase a fuel stabilizer such as Sta-bil, to prevent ethanol buildup and protect the engine from gum, varnish and rust. The fuel stabilizer will prevent the gas from deteriorating for up to 12 months."

-Edmunds
 

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From page 247 in the manual:
Storing the motorcycle
If the motorcycle is to be left unridden over long
periods, you should perform the following
procedures before storing it away:
- clean the motorcycle;
- empty the fuel tank;
- place the motorcycle on a service stand;
- disconnect, remove the battery and periodically
charge it using the battery charge maintainer (see
page 228);
- Protect the motorcycle with a suitable canvas.
This will protect paintwork and prevent retaining
condensate. The canvas is available from Ducati
Performance
 

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How long will it be stored away? If it is only for a couple of months, with stabil in the tank your gas shouldn't go bad. I usually like to keep the tank full since a full tank helps with corrosion not happening.
 

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definitely want to fill the tank and put StaBil in - might want to run it for a couple minutes with the StaBil in if you get down to zero or below for an extended period of time, that'll make sure all gas in the lines are stabilized
 

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The two periods of the year I hate the most:
Late November and Late March. Can't Ride & Can't Ski.

Winterization: (Keep it simple)
1) keep the bike off the ground
2) vapor barrier under it (rubber mat, plywood etc)
3) fuel stabilizer and run it through
4) quality battery tender
 

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definitely want to fill the tank and put StaBil in - might want to run it for a couple minutes with the StaBil in if you get down to zero or below for an extended period of time, that'll make sure all gas in the lines are stabilized
this for me on all machines, snowblower for summer, lawn mower for winter, bikes for winter, etc.
 

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Kind of an old topic, but another thing to ponder about is that stabilizing the fuel is one of those "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" things. Short term, fuel's not gonna go bad, but its effect might compound over the years. Not so much of a problem for our bikes, but carbed bikes definitely build up gunk over time.

Good practices lead to less headaches down the road.
 

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I'm reading two opposite thing here...

1) empty the tank after putting stabilizer mixed with the gas...

2) fill the tank with stabilizer...

Which should we even choice??.... reading the manual it says to remove the battery but others says use battery tenders which I have been hearing alot....

I got a rear stand for my bike... would a block of wood be accept to keep the front off the ground??
 

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1) empty the tank after putting stabilizer mixed with the gas...

2) fill the tank with stabilizer...
No and no (not literally at least). Best would be to put the instructed amount of stabilizer for about 3 gallons into an empty tank, then fill it full with gas, such that the stabilizer mixes with the gas fully. Then run it for a bit so it get the stabilizer/fuel mix through all of the fuel system so it protects it all.

reading the manual it says to remove the battery but others says use battery tenders which I have been hearing alot....
In the 2016 manual, it doesn't state anything about removing the battery (page 228-229 under "Charging and maintenance of the battery during winter storage"). It even mentions Ducati's own branded battery maintainer. Here's all the text:

Charging and maintenance of the battery during winter storage
Your motorcycle is equipped with a connector (1) to which you can connect a special battery charger (2) (Battery maintainer kit part no. 69924601A - various countries; Battery maintainer kit part no. 69924601AX - for Japan, China and Australia only) available from our sales network.

...

When the motorcycle is left unused (approximately for more than 30 days) we recommend owners to use the Ducati battery charge maintainer (Battery maintainer kit part no. 69924601A - various countries; Battery maintainer kit part no. 69924601AX - for Japan, China and Australia only) since its electronics monitors the battery voltage and features a maximum charge current of 1.5 Ah. Connect the maintainer to the diagnostics socket located in the rear end of the bike.

I got a rear stand for my bike... would a block of wood be accept to keep the front off the ground??
There is minimal benefit to putting a wood block between the tire and the ground unless you have some concern that water will pool around your tire. If you mean you'll use a block of wood to lift the front tire up in the air, I'm curious as to how you'd go about doing that.
 

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1) empty the tank after putting stabilizer mixed with the gas...

2) fill the tank with stabilizer...
No and no (not literally at least). Best would be to put the instructed amount of stabilizer for about 3 gallons into an empty tank, then fill it full with gas, such that the stabilizer mixes with the gas fully. Then run it for a bit so it get the stabilizer/fuel mix through all of the fuel system so it protects it all.

reading the manual it says to remove the battery but others says use battery tenders which I have been hearing alot....
In the 2016 manual, it doesn't state anything about removing the battery (page 228-229 under "Charging and maintenance of the battery during winter storage"). It even mentions Ducati's own branded battery maintainer. Here's all the text:

Charging and maintenance of the battery during winter storage
Your motorcycle is equipped with a connector (1) to which you can connect a special battery charger (2) (Battery maintainer kit part no. 69924601A - various countries; Battery maintainer kit part no. 69924601AX - for Japan, China and Australia only) available from our sales network.

...

When the motorcycle is left unused (approximately for more than 30 days) we recommend owners to use the Ducati battery charge maintainer (Battery maintainer kit part no. 69924601A - various countries; Battery maintainer kit part no. 69924601AX - for Japan, China and Australia only) since its electronics monitors the battery voltage and features a maximum charge current of 1.5 Ah. Connect the maintainer to the diagnostics socket located in the rear end of the bike.

I got a rear stand for my bike... would a block of wood be accept to keep the front off the ground??
There is minimal benefit to putting a wood block between the tire and the ground unless you have some concern that water will pool around your tire. If you mean you'll use a block of wood to lift the front tire up in the air, I'm curious as to how you'd go about doing that.
It mentioned to remove battery for my 2018... very strange.... and I have been thinking no one mention much about the engine oil....

I replace oil and oil filter 1,500 miles ago... its require to drain it out...?? If so, it would be a pain in the butt if have to purchase all new oils n oil filters plus rings for them before spring comes..... dont you think?
 

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It's pretty cold and didn't find the time to wash my bike before officially having it in storage.... it come across my mind of the idea of how to wash my bike n clean my chains during cold weather to prevent it from rust and keeping the clearcoat....

Thinking a bucket of warm water and soap shall do the trick.... but for chains... not sure because of the degreaser....
 

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It's pretty cold and didn't find the time to wash my bike before officially having it in storage.... it come across my mind of the idea of how to wash my bike n clean my chains during cold weather to prevent it from rust and keeping the clearcoat....

Thinking a bucket of warm water and soap shall do the trick.... but for chains... not sure because of the degreaser....
Too late to wet wash your bike now as you can't give it a warm-up ride thereafter.
That can wait. Grease your chain if it needs it even if dirty.

(Keep it simple)
1) fuel stabilizer and run it through
2) keep both tires off the ground
3)) vapor barrier under it (rubber mat, plywood etc). This will prevent corrosion. Cover with a breathable dust cover.
4) plug it in with a quality battery tender

Don't start it periodically if you're in freezing temperatures. This will do more harm than good.
 

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It's pretty cold and didn't find the time to wash my bike before officially having it in storage.... it come across my mind of the idea of how to wash my bike n clean my chains during cold weather to prevent it from rust and keeping the clearcoat....

Thinking a bucket of warm water and soap shall do the trick.... but for chains... not sure because of the degreaser....
Too late to wet wash your bike now as you can't give it a warm-up ride thereafter.
That can wait. Grease your chain if it needs it even if dirty.

(Keep it simple)
1) fuel stabilizer and run it through
2) keep both tires off the ground
3)) vapor barrier under it (rubber mat, plywood etc). This will prevent corrosion. Cover with a breathable dust cover.
4) plug it in with a quality battery tender

Don't start it periodically if you're in freezing temperatures. This will do more harm than good.
Alright thanks will go ahead get fuel stabilizer today it's at 30 degrees here in IL USA.... I believe my tank is almost full but gotta double check... I out in my friends garage because I live in an apartment. Should able to get these tasks down today when i finish work otherwise tmw since I'm off tmw.
 

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I'm reading two opposite thing here...

1) empty the tank after putting stabilizer mixed with the gas...

2) fill the tank with stabilizer...

Which should we even choice??.... reading the manual it says to remove the battery but others says use battery tenders which I have been hearing alot....

I got a rear stand for my bike... would a block of wood be accept to keep the front off the ground??
For about 10 years of motorcycle ownership, I've done the following to the gas tank for winter storage
1. add fuel stabil into tank for amount of gas left in tank
2. go for a ride, to get the stabilized gas fed into all the lines
3. fill up gas tank up, then add stabil based on the amount pumped

I'm no expert on gas tanks but a large majority of the sites, people, and resources I've referenced say it helps prevent condensation and corrosion. I have never had issues with gas tanks and fueling (knock on wood).

As for the battery tender, I've asked similar questions about charging the battery and battery storage.
https://www.959panigale.net/forum/959-panigale-general-discussion/15314-maintain-battery.html
https://www.959panigale.net/forum/959-panigale-general-discussion/10329-battery-tender-why-do-i-need-one.html
Short story is you can (but it isn't recommended) keep the battery in the motorcycle while charging. The battery will be fine in the freezing temps as long as it is fully charged. I've been doing exactly this for months now on my 959 and have not had issues (again, knock on wood).

I recommend getting a front stand to lift your front wheel off the ground. Putting the tire on wood instead of concrete won't make a big difference.
 

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In the 2016 manual, it doesn't state anything about removing the battery (page 228-229 under "Charging and maintenance of the battery during winter storage"). It even mentions Ducati's own branded battery maintainer.
I see the 2017 and 2018 959 manuals mentioning "Before charging the battery, it is best to remove it from the motorcycle"

I checked a 2009 Honda CBR 600RR and a 2017 BMW S1000RR manual and they both suggested to remove/disconnect the battery from the bike for charging. I believe it is to prevent potential charger malfunctions from impacting the sensitive electronics. I use the CTEK Multi US 4.3 which is short-circuit proof, so I feel better about leaving the battery connected to the bike while charging.

It mentioned to remove battery for my 2018... very strange.... and I have been thinking no one mention much about the engine oil....

I replace oil and oil filter 1,500 miles ago... its require to drain it out...?? If so, it would be a pain in the butt if have to purchase all new oils n oil filters plus rings for them before spring comes..... dont you think?
I've never ONLY drained out the engine oil before storage. I tend to do an oil change before storing the motorcycle though. Sometimes I do an oil change after storage too.
 

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Winterization as previously mentioned, is not onerous but does necessitates a bit of forward planning.
Changing the oil and filter now is not a good idea if you're in freezing temperatures. Change it in the spring.
Next year however, schedule your oil & filter change in the fall or a month or so prior to winterization.
For me, October is oil change month.
 

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Most important.
If you're an occasional track enthusiast, do remember to replace your Water Wetter with proper anti-freeze coolant fluid.
 
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Most important.
If you're an occasional track enthusiast, do remember to replace your Water Wetter with proper anti-freeze coolant fluid.
#NeverForget
 
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